Disaccharides

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What is a disaccharide?

A disaccharide is the sugar formed when two monosaccharides are joined by glycosidic linkage. They are normally referred to as simple sugars. Their role is to quickly provide energy for the body, they are water-soluble and are easily broken down by enzymes. When they are broken down, they are split into monosaccharides, and it is in this form that the body can absorb them into the bloodstream.

Examples of disaccharides

The three most common examples of disaccharides include:

Sucrose

Sucrose is a combination of glucose and fructose sugars. They are found in many foods and are often added as sweeteners. Sucrose can be found in table sugar, candy, soft drinks, and sugary fruits like watermelon and banana.

Maltose

Maltose is a combination of glucose molecules, and it can be obtained from edamame beans, bread, pizza, cakes, and cookies

Lactose

Lactose is a milk sugar made up of a mixture of glucose and galactose. It is mostly found in dairy products like yoghurt, ice cream, and cheese. People who are lactose intolerant simply can’t digest this type of sugar.

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